5 Basic Massages to Alleviate Trigger Point Pain

Anyone who engages in a work-out or any strenuous activity takes their physical condition into consideration, not just athletes or professionals. After each work-out or activity, even with proper warm-ups and cool-down routines, sometimes sore muscles are still inevitable. Sore muscles usually feel better after a day or two of rest, but if you have recurring muscle pain - particularly in your neck, shoulders, back, thighs and legs, and you can identify the spot where it originates, you may have a trigger point pain.

Self-myofascial massage can help in increasing blood flow, reducing muscle soreness, sustaining normal functioning of muscular length and improving lymph movement.

Basic Neck Massage

1. Place a lacrosse massage ball against a wall as shown in the image on the left.

2. Start rolling the massage ball up and down the neck area. Trigger points should be easy to spot when you start feeling soreness or tightness.

3. Stop and hold the position in trigger points for a few seconds.

Back and Lower Shoulder Massage

1. Place a massage ball under your lower or middle trapezius, just to the right of your spine. You can then hold or control the ball using the back of a chair, a wall, or the ground.

2. Roll the ball over your middle and lower trapezius muscles. Once you find a sore or tight spot, hold your position and focus the pressure in that area

3. Repeat this step on the other side, and as much as comfortable to you. You can also stretch your muscles further by crossing your arms in front of your chest.

Forearm Massages

1. Find a surface where you can put your massage ball against your forearm: it can be a table, a bench, or a wall. Gently push the ball to the surface until your desired pressure.

2. While pressing the ball with your forearms, roll it back and forth, locating any trigger point. Keep rolling and pressing on the ball for 30-90 seconds.

3. Alternatively, you can extend (close and open) your hands to further stretch your flexors while rolling the ball.

4. Switch sides and repeat. This massage can be done to your anterior and posterior forearm.

Calves Massage

Note: This massage will work well if you have a yoga block, or a stack of books to keep the massage ball or roller elevated.

1. Place the massager at the top of the yoga block. Sit on your buttocks, and place a leg on top of the ball/roller. Position the other leg on top of the leg that you want to work.

2. Start rolling the ball/roller along your calf until your heel, and roll back near your knee, applying more pressure to any trigger points you find.

3. Work your inner calf by slightly twisting your leg so you can target more trigger points from various angles.

Foot Massages

1. Stand with your back to a wall. Position your massage ball under the ball of one foot while keeping your heel flat on the floor.

2. Gently lean your upper body to the wall to further stretch your foot.

3. Hold your breath and keep this position for 10-20 seconds.

4. Switch sides and repeat.

Self-myofascial release or self-massages can help you heal faster so you can perform better in life.

1 comment

Winifred S Gamble

I wish need one how to used it

Winifred S Gamble

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